Earn up to 15 CE Hours
Includes 3 Ethics CE Hours and 3 Cultural Diversity CE Hours
Wednesday, February 14, 2018
8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Thursday, February 15, 2018
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM
8:45 AM - 10:15 AM
America is a country in pain. Physical pain receives much attention, but often the impact of emotional or spiritual pain is underemphasized, particularly in discussions regarding the opioid crisis. In fact, physical pain is usually accompanied—and enhanced—by emotional distress. This presentation will explore the critical role that behavioral healthcare professionals have in reducing individual suffering and providing non-pharmacologic solutions to address chronic physical pain. Dr. Pohl will delve into the principles of chronic pain, the effects of emotional distress on increasing chronic pain, and the techniques to manage opioid dependence and chronic pain with clinical methods including mindfulness, CBT, DBT, and ACT.
10:15 AM - 10:45 AM
10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
The successful management of chronic pain most often requires comprehensive approaches that include self-care, psychological, functional-restorative, and alternative-integrative approaches to complement medical treatments. Self-management or self-directed approaches may include psychological self-help, relaxation techniques, behavioral approaches, online support, group support, nutrition, graded exercise, and other approaches. In many cases, it is crucial to provide self-management support and motivate patients to become active participants in their own treatment process.
The most important decision a clinician can make is to decide which medication assisted treatment (MAT) solutions can be applied for each patient who presents for care—whether in a law enforcement setting following an arrest or a hospital emergency room following an overdose. It is important for clinicians to examine their biases for and against MAT and how those biases may act to interfere with referral to and advocacy for the most appropriate treatment. Following this workshop the participant will be able to describe why it is important for the treatment community to advocate for access to a variety of strategies that can be used to treat or respond to opioid use disorder (OUD); what is needed to provide treatment which attempts to block, fill or repair opioid receptors in individuals with OUD; the structural and legal barriers to access to care for OUD; and how clinicians can act to improve access to care for OUD, which in turn can modify the trajectory of this disorder and the opioid crisis in the United States.
12:15 PM - 1:30 PM
12:45 PM - 1:30 PM
Millions of people have recovered from addictions utilizing a 12-Step formula. This special lunch presentation is not just for those in recovery. It will provide a visual clarification of the 12 Steps in a way that anyone can relate to. Prager will share personal information and educate those attending with a magical entertainment style.
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
In this session Dr. Davis will take the audience through a neuroscience informed overview of what pain is from nociceptive pain to neuropathic pain to pain for psychological reasons, and build on that foundation in a discussion of “how to talk to your patients about pain in a way that engages them is appropriate care”. At the end of the session we will take a step back from the addiction narrative, challenge the assumptions that underlie our current approach to the opioid crisis, and Dr. Davis will build on the first segment of the session to recast the opioid crisis as a trauma crisis requiring somewhat different resources and a different approach.
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Psychotherapy, the 12 Steps and Medication Assisted Therapy (MAT) each present unique opportunities to help those who struggling with addiction. Each approach has also developed its own following, which can be antagonistic at times toward the others, even to the point of disseminating false information.
5:00 PM - 5:30 PM
5:00 PM - 8:45 PM
Dinner Session
Trauma, societal and family rejection, and unwelcoming healthcare environments place transgender and gender non-conforming (TGNC) people at a disproportionately higher risk of opioid addiction and overdose. As the percentage of people who identify as transgender continues to grow, treatment professionals face many complex challenges in effectively serving this important and vulnerable population in both residential and outpatient settings. This session will provide answers to complex questions regarding how to effectively manage clinical care, housing concerns and the patient milieu when working with TGNC people in treatment settings.
Dinner Session
This workshop focuses upon the basic legal and ethical issues related to suicide, social media, and substance use. Participants will review current expert opinion, legal updates and standard of care related to (1) proper use of DSM-5 when diagnosing substance related disorders; (2) updates on relationship between social media and suicide; (3) American Academy of Pediatrics suicide assessment; (4) substance use disorders and the risk of suicide; (5) legal and ethical issues with informed consent and “safety agreements”; and (6) Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Literature updates, along with relevant Codes of Ethics will be included in all areas of discussion.
5:15 PM - 6:15 PM
Friday, February 16, 2018
7:30 AM - 8:30 AM
8:30 AM - 8:45 AM
8:45 AM - 10:15 AM
As adolescents transition into adulthood, their entire lives are ahead of them: careers, families, and exploring the world on their own. This is also a very turbulent time, and co-occurring depression and anxiety can make an exciting time in their lives a scary and distressing experience. And when the situation is overwhelming, young adults are too frequently turning to opioids and other drugs to unsuccessfully address their suffering. This presentation will explore how the developmental needs of this age group, often defined as ages 18 to 26, impact their treatment.
10:15 AM - 10:45 AM
10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
When individuals enter treatment they often experience a great deal of ambivalence, and post-acute withdrawal from opioid use also makes it difficult for clients to feel comfortable in their bodies. In this presentation, participants will hear about the movement and mindfulness-based program interventions delivered by a women’s recovery center. Based on best practices and current research, participants will be guided through the why and how of movement and mindfulness programming with clients.
12:15 PM - 1:30 PM
1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Motivational interviewing (MI) is a collaborative, goal-oriented method of communication intended to strengthen personal motivation for and commitment to a change. Participants will learn how motivational interviewing has been used in the substance use disorder treatment arena to improve treatment engagement, treatment retention, and adherence to treatment and case plans. MI’s numerous implications for the opioid epidemic will be discussed, including: ensuring better medication compliance for those taking prescription opioids, enlisting ambivalent patients with opioid use disorders into treatment programs, and engaging criminal justice-involved opioid patients.
The presentation will provide an introduction to the post induction treatment (PIT) model for addiction and codependency, based on the work of world renown author and clinician Pia Mellody. Exploration of how childhood relational trauma can be a significant contributor to serious and chronic addiction will be discussed. This presentation, in addition to providing an overview of the PIT model, will discuss the efficacy of this treatment the model is useful for clients in the treatment of addictions, codependency and/or developmental arrest. Practical application of this model in therapeutic practice will be addressed.
3:00 PM - 3:30 PM
3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Working with those who use opiates and other addictive drugs can be challenging, as these patients can exhibit stubborn patterns of behavior, physiological dependency and, in many cases, issues associated with psychological trauma. This presentation will describe approaches for dealing with understandable clinician reactions to such problems, including frustration, impatience, feelings of relative helplessness or ineffectiveness, and triggered feelings based on the therapist’s own childhood exposure to parental drug or alcohol abuse. These reactions may be particularly exacerbated as clinicians treat patients during the national opioid crisis.